Monthly Archives: September 2017

IS A PICTURE STILL WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS?

By Yvonne Blackwood ~

Photo by Linh Pham

Not so long ago, if you wrote an article, it was imperative that you included a picture or two. Why? Because as the old adage states, a picture is worth a thousand words. Besides, pictures help to emphasize the point of your article, or at least make it more interesting and appealing.

According to one social media guru, an article on social media with an image is 10 times more likely to be viewed versus one without. In fact, depending on the audience, a stand alone picture can attract more attention than an article. I recently experienced this personally when I posted a picture I had taken of a robin’s nest with three blue eggs on my front porch. The picture was posted on LinkedIn with a one-line caption, yet it received more views than any single 500-word article I had ever written!

It was Aristotle who said that “Art is the realization in external form of a true idea, and is traced back to that natural love of imitation which characterizes humans, and to the pleasure which we feel in recognizing likenesses.” Small wonder then that today’s article writers utilize visuals to help tell their stories.

What else is there about images why we love them so much? We love them because of our cognition and ability to pay attention, and images have the ability to attract our attention. In addition, bright colours engage attention quickly because our brains are made to respond to them. Furthermore, our sense of vision is the most active of the senses. One could say that The National Geographic Society would never have gained the prominence it has without those haunting, exotic photographs taken by the many photographers the employ.

But in the last ten years or so, the paradigm has shifted. A still photograph, it seems, is not good enough to emphasize points and attract readers to our articles. The Internet has changed the way we publish and view information. Now we utilize multi-media―a mixture of text and other media such as pictures, hyperlinks, and videos. According to Wistia, a video-hosting company, people spend on average of 2.6x more time on pages with video than without. This partly explains why video usage is growing rapidly.

Having resisted this digital media in the past, after completing the Digital Humanities course at York University last semester, I took the plunge and made a YouTube video to promote my children’s books. Why? Because authors who are keen to promote their books are utilizing videos to do so; a still picture is just not good enough anymore. It turns out that the post with the video garnered more views than any other article I have ever posted!

The essence of this story is, a picture may still be worth a thousand words, but articles with videos may be worth twice as many. Things are always changing, paradigm shifts are inevitable, and we should not be afraid to embrace technology―to some degree.

Let kids ages 4-8 unleash their creativity and colour the pictures in Nosey Charlie Chokes On A Wiener Colouring Book with wild abandon!  Amazon.com

MY YOUTUBE VIDEO

WRITING CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOKS: The Struggle Between Opposing Forces (part 12)

By Yvonne Blackwood ~

In our very first article in this series I asserted that every story begins with an idea. I further emphasized in part 4 that every good story has a beginning―the point where you introduce your main character and grab the reader’s interest―a middle―the place where conflict builds up, and an end―the place where conflicts are resolved.

Conflicts

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, conflict is, “competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons.” Conflict is the soul of drama, and a key component of all fiction that is required to hold the readers interest. Without conflict there is no drama; your story will be dull and uneventful.

Types of Conflict  

Literary scholars have narrowed down the types of conflicts to five:

Man versus self

Man versus society

Man versus man

Man versus nature

Man versus supernatural

In your Johnnie Rabbit story, you will substitute Johnnie for man and determine who or what he has a conflict with. Is it farmer Jones next door (man)? Or is it against the vegetables in the garden (nature)?

The Importance of Conflict

An important question regarding fiction writing is, why is conflict so important? In some of my earlier articles I wrote that character, plot, setting and dialogue were key components of fiction writing. I must now add conflict. It is the glue that paces a story; it builds and builds to a crescendo. As conflict builds, it keeps readers reading, wanting to find out more―what happens next.  In my Nosey Charlie Goes To Court story, Charlie has a conflict with his Aunt Leticia. She has instructed him never to leave the park where they live, and he is to stay with his cousin Pete at all times. But Charlie is overly nosey; he must find out what is going on in the white building next door. He sneaks out of the park without Pete or his guardian knowing, and enters the building. A chain of events occurs after that. He is almost trampled by the many feet going in and out of the building. He slips through the first door he sees and finds himself in a courtroom! The drama escalates when someone screams RATS! Mistaking him for one of those hated creatures. The story climaxes when Charlie is locked in the courtroom unknowingly and he can’t get out.

There must be a resolution

Of course, as long as there is conflict there must also be resolution―you do not leave your young readers hanging. In part 10 I mentioned The Three Little Pigs; the conflict in that story was resolved when the big bad wolf fell into the pot of scalding water and the pigs ate him for dinner. In Cinderella, she married the handsome prince and lived happily ever after. In Nosey Charlie Goes To Court, Charlie returns home safely (though scared to death) apologizes for leaving the park and Pete is assigned to stay with him at all times.

FREE BONUS GIFT, a 32-page Nosey Charlie Chokes On A Wiener! Colouring Book  offered to eBook purchasers Nosey Charlie Chokes On A Wiener! picture book for a limited time. Books are for ages 3-8.